Vibrio Cholera Testing

 
 

Reliable Testing Solutions for
the Detection of Vibrio Cholerae

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Vibrio cholerae is a strictly aqueous organism. Brackish and marine waters are natural environments of Vibrio cholerae O1 or O139, the etiologic agents of the disease cholera. The main route of transmission is fecal-oral, usually indirectly via polluted water supplies or irrigation water. Another common source is raw or undercooked shellfish.

MilliporeSigma offers a considerable selection of products for the enrichment, detection and isolation of Vibrio cholerae. The range includes dehydrated culture media in a unique and easy-to-use granulated format. These meet the highest industry standards for performance as laid out in ISO 11133.

Method ISO 21872 FDA BAM Chapter 9
1st selective enrichment Alkaline Saline Peptone Water 37 ± 1°C or 41.5 ±1°C (fresh products);
6 ± 0.5 h
Alkaline Peptone Water 35 ± 2°C; 7 ± 1 h (18-21 h for processed foods) / 42±0.2°C; 18-21 h for raw oysters.
2nd selective enrichment Alkaline Saline Peptone Water 41.5 ±1°C; 18 ± 1 h N/A
Plating

CBS Agar, 37 ±1°C; 21 ± 3 h
additional medium of choice

TCBS Agar, 35 ± 2°C; 21 ± 3 h
Procedure
step
Product
description
ISO 21872BAM Ch. 9
Enrichment Alkaline Peptone Water Merck:/Freestyle/BM-BioMonitoring/Pathogen-and-Spoilage-Testing/BioM-check-10022013-93x68.jpg Merck:/Freestyle/BM-BioMonitoring/Pathogen-and-Spoilage-Testing/BioM-check-10022013-93x68.jpg
 
Isolation/
confirmation
  
TCBS Agar Merck:/Freestyle/BM-BioMonitoring/Pathogen-and-Spoilage-Testing/BioM-check-10022013-93x68.jpg Merck:/Freestyle/BM-BioMonitoring/Pathogen-and-Spoilage-Testing/BioM-check-10022013-93x68.jpg
 

Members of the genus Vibrio are defined as Gram-negative, asporogenous, motile rods that are straight or comma-shaped. Vibrio cholerae is a strictly aqueous organism and brackish and marine waters are natural environments for the etiologic agents of cholera, Vibrio cholerae O1 or O139. The main route of transmission is fecal-oral, indirectly via polluted water supplies or irrigation water. Another common source is contaminated shellfish that is raw or undercooked.

Cholera

Cholera is an infection of the small intestines caused by cholera enterotoxin (CT) producing Vibrio cholerae of serogroups O1 and O139. Other serogroups and non-toxigenic strains may cause similar diseases but are rarely involved in large outbreaks and are not reported by the WHO as cholera.

The symptoms are often mild, but up to 10% of patients may experience classical cholera symptoms with profuse watery diarrhea (“rice water stool”) and often vomiting. This can lead to rapid dehydration (up to 25 liters per day) and electrolyte imbalance. Standard treatment consists of oral rehydration therapy with a sugar and electrolyte solution or, in severe cases, intravenous rehydration. Untreated cholera is often fatal due to dehydration and shock.

 
 
 

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