Webinars and Customer Testimonials

Request Information

Tune in as thought leaders from fields as diverse as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), cancer research, and cell biology share their research and introduce applications where Muse® assays can enrich our understanding of function and dysfunction of the cell cycle, cell signaling, and how cells die.

Featured MilliporeSigma Webinar Demonstrating the Muse® Cell Analyzer


Therapeutic and Diagnostic Activities of Non-Natural Nucleosides to Enhance Cancer Treatment

Oct2015
  • Presenter: Dr. Anthony J. Berdis, Cleveland State University
  • Abstract
    According to the American Cancer Society, there will be more than 1.7 million new cases of cancers diagnosed in 2015. More than 50% of these patients will be treated with DNA damaging agents as part of their therapy. Unfortunately, many will not respond favorably to these treatments for several reasons that include ineffective DNA repair and the subsequent misreplication of unrepaired DNA lesions.

    The Berdis lab has taken an innovative approach to combat the latter complication by developing a series of non-natural nucleoside analogs that selectively and potently inhibit the ability of specialized DNA polymerases to replicate certain DNA lesions. Dr. Anthony Berdis will discuss a specific nucleoside analog designated 5-Endosine which shows unprecedented specificity for targeting terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) and pol eta, two specialized DNA polymerases involved in replicating DNA lesions in cancers such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    He will discuss how 5-Endosine can be used as a “theranostic agent” – compounds that possess both therapeutic and diagnostic activities. Combining these properties provides a way to accurately measure the therapeutic activity of the drug in real time and ultimately represents a new area in personalized medicine that may lead to more effective treatments and patient responses to chemotherapy.


Simplified Methods for Investigating Deregulation of the Cell Cycle and Apoptosis in Cancer Progression, and the Implications for Anti-Cancer Therapies

June2015
  • Presenters: Dr. Kai Stoeber, Shionogi Ltd.; and Dr. Kamala Tyagarajan, MilliporeSigma
  • Abstract
    The complexities of cancer research demand diverse approaches that include studies of the critical events that propel the tumor cell and its progeny into uncontrolled expansion and invasion. This evolution of normal cells into cancer cells is facilitated by loss of fidelity in the processes that replicate, repair and segregate the genome, such as the regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis and cell proliferation. Recent advances in our understanding of these critical events suggest molecular mechanisms for cellular transformation, and may help to identify potential targets for improved cancer therapies. The DNA replication initiation machinery, a component of the cell cycle engine which serves as a relay station connecting signaling networks with DNA synthesis, is a promising target for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. In this webinar Dr. Kai Stoeber (Shionogi Ltd.) will introduce methods for studying DNA replication initiation factors in human tissues and body fluids and provide an overview of their clinical utility for cancer detection, prognosis and prediction of therapeutic response to cell cycle phase-specific drugs. He will also discuss the emerging concept of targeting the replication initiation machinery for cancer therapy. Dr. Kamala Tyagarajan (MilliporeSigma) will present data from studies performed on a novel flow cytometry platform that quantitates the actions of anti-cancer compounds on apoptosis/cell death and cell cycle arrest in parallel. She will also discuss simplified methods and assays for accurate evaluation of cell cycle distribution and Annexin V-based apoptosis detection, caspase activation and cell death.

Click for more webinars.

Many Roads to Cell Death: Gaining a Practical Understanding of Apoptosis, Necrosis, and Autophagy

June2014
  • Presenters: John Abrams, Ph.D., University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX and William G. Telford, Ph.D., National Institutes of Health.Bethesda, MD
  • Abstract
    Cell death is, ironically, an essential part of life. In recent years, the study and understanding of cell death pathways has been dramatically transformed by the insights gained into non-apoptotic pathways, including necro-apoptosis and autophagy, together with a deeper understanding of the mechanism of the apoptotic cascade. New discoveries have been enabled by cutting-edge technologies, particularly in the realm of cytometry and cell-death–specific markers. In this webinar, the latest insights into cell death pathways will be discussed, including the molecular markers and cellular changes that characterize each pathway. Viewers will also learn practical cytometry-based strategies for dissecting cell death pathways, and how to use the data to better understand the pathophysiology of diseases such as cancer as well as to uncover new targets for drug discovery and development.

    During this webinar, the speakers will:
    • Review the latest insights into the different cell death pathways
    • Present their own recent data and research on cell death mechanisms and impacts
    • Describe techniques to detect and dissect cell death pathways
    • Answer your questions live and in real time!


Synergistic cytotoxicity of pre-transplant drugs used in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

Oct2013
  • Presenters: Ben C. Valdez, Ph.D., Associate Professor, The University of Texas and Mark Santos, R&D Manager, MilliporeSigma
  • Abstract
    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is used for treatment of hematologic malignancies. The success of HSCT largely depends on the efficacy of pre-transplant/conditioning therapy. Dr. Ben Valdez’s laboratory aims to design efficacious and safe conditioning regimens by identifying HSCT drugs that provide synergistic cytotoxicity when combined. Most recently, his team reported the synergism of two nucleoside analogs, gemcitabine (Gem) and clofarabine (Clo), in killing multiple myeloma (MM) cell lines and cells derived from MM patients. Drug cytotoxicity was monitored by Annexin V assay using the Muse® Cell Analyzer and synergism was determined by the Chou and Talalay method. The mechanism of cytotoxicity was determined by Western blot analysis, PCR and flow cytometry. The synergistic cytotoxicity of Gem and Clo could be attributed to at least five interrelated mechanisms: (1) Gem-mediated activation/phosphorylation of deoxycytidine kinase, which initially phosphorylates nucleoside analogs, (2) inhibition of DNA synthesis and repair, (3) nucleolar stress through inhibition of rRNA production, (4) decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, and (5) induction of apoptosis. The preclinical results provide a rationale for clinical trials incorporating [Gem+Clo] combinations as part of conditioning therapy for high-risk patients with MM undergoing HSCT. Dr. Valdez will be covering the key aspects of his study during the first part of the talk. Following Dr. Valdez’s talk, Mark Santos will provide a brief overview of the underlying technology and capabilities of the Muse® Cell Analyzer.


Therapeutic and Diagnostic Activities of Non-Natural Nucleosides to Enhance Cancer Treatment

Oct2015
  • Presenter: Dr. Anthony J. Berdis, Cleveland State University
  • Abstract
    According to the American Cancer Society, there will be more than 1.7 million new cases of cancers diagnosed in 2015. More than 50% of these patients will be treated with DNA damaging agents as part of their therapy. Unfortunately, many will not respond favorably to these treatments for several reasons that include ineffective DNA repair and the subsequent misreplication of unrepaired DNA lesions.

    The Berdis lab has taken an innovative approach to combat the latter complication by developing a series of non-natural nucleoside analogs that selectively and potently inhibit the ability of specialized DNA polymerases to replicate certain DNA lesions. Dr. Anthony Berdis will discuss a specific nucleoside analog designated 5-Endosine which shows unprecedented specificity for targeting terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) and pol eta, two specialized DNA polymerases involved in replicating DNA lesions in cancers such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    He will discuss how 5-Endosine can be used as a “theranostic agent” – compounds that possess both therapeutic and diagnostic activities. Combining these properties provides a way to accurately measure the therapeutic activity of the drug in real time and ultimately represents a new area in personalized medicine that may lead to more effective treatments and patient responses to chemotherapy.


Novel Benchtop Solutions for Immunology: The Muse® Cell Analyzer

July | 2013
  • Presenter: Dr. Kamala Tyagarajan, MilliporeSigma
  • Abstract
    The Muse® Cell Analyzer is an innovative, small footprint, affordable cell analyzer that can rapidly provide quantitative cellular data using a guided touchscreen interface along with simple, easy-to-use protocols. This webinar will feature Muse® Cell Analyzer assays designed for immunology research applications, including those assays developed for the identification and enumeration of CD4 T cells, CD8 T cells or B cells in whole blood or PBMC samples. Join us to learn how easy it can be to monitor lymphocyte activation and count CD4 T cells, CD8 T cells or B cells in whole blood or PBMC samples. 


Hear it Directly from Your Scientific Peers

As scientists, peer review is the gold standard by which we assess technologies, second only to trying out tools and reagents ourselves. Routine but essential cell analysis assays are faster, easier, and more data-rich with the Muse®. Get more insight on the Muse® cell analyzer from our customers.

Read the Muse® Cell Analyzer Reviews

"My lab has been using the Muse® for about one year now and I can say that the Muse® is exceptional. The Muse® cuts the time of manually counting by half… I would recommend the Muse® to anyone who does manual counting." 
- T. Weaver, Duke University, USA


"I just started to use Muse® cell analyzer, and I'm happy with it at least for now. The machine is user friendly, easy to learn and maintain. The thing I have to mention is I had a good experience with the custom service. Larry is very helpful." 
- M. Zhao, University at Buffalo, USA


“We bought the Muse® in order to do quick experiments without having the full set up of a FACS…We are able to do quick and accurate cell counts, then run assays all in the convenience of the lab. The results seem to be consistent with what we would be getting using the FACS.“ 
M. de la Vega, University of Hawaii, USA


Share it here